The updated WHO air quality guidelines are a big step forward but not a complete solution

Yaguang Wei and Joel Schwartz from Harvard’s Department of Environmental Health argue that while WHO’s tightened air quality guidelines are beneficial, more action is needed to reduce air pollution. Studies show fine particulate matter (PM) 2.5 is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and meeting the new guidelines could reduce hospital admissions by 23% in…

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Genetic germline variations influence expression of cancer cell genes, finds study

Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine investigated the impact of germline or inherited structural variations on gene expression in human cancers. Published in Cell Reports Medicine, the study found that specific germline structural variations could be potential candidates for cancer genetic testing, especially those involving genes with therapeutic targeting implications. Structural variations are changes in…

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Xolair a New Weapon Against Food Allergies, but Questions Remain

Kathy N. has dealt with multiple food allergies since childhood, relying on over-the-counter medications for relief. The FDA recently approved a drug called Xolair to reduce the risk of life-threatening allergic reactions, offering hope to the millions affected by food allergies. Studies have shown promising results in providing protection against accidental exposures to various allergens….

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Baby Sleep Planner Aims to Cut Infant Deaths

Researchers at the University of Bristol have developed an app called the Baby Sleep Planner to assess the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and improve the communication of safer sleep advice to families. The app has received positive feedback from professionals and families. SIDS is still a leading cause of infant mortality, particularly…

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Extended anaerobic coverage in aspiration pneumonia not associated with additional mortality benefit: Study

A study found that providing extended anaerobic coverage in aspiration pneumonia does not result in additional mortality benefit. This means that the use of additional antibiotics targeting anaerobic bacteria does not improve outcomes for patients with this type of pneumonia. The research suggests that current treatment strategies for aspiration pneumonia may be effective without the…

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Redefining Survivorship: Proactive Strategies for Preventing Chronic Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema

As breast cancer therapy improves survival rates, the impact of long-term treatment complications like lymphedema becomes more significant. Breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) can have quality of life and economic implications, with treatment costs ranging from $14,877 to $23,167 over two years. Early detection of BCRL is crucial to prevent progression to chronic lymphedema. Bioimpedance spectroscopy…

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HIQA’s Orla Jenkins awarded prestigious Janssen Bursary medal for Health Economics

Janssen has been collaborating with the University of Galway since 2012, providing Health Economics students with placement opportunities. At an event, students and lecturers met with Janssen’s Market Access and Government Affairs team, engaging in presentations and workshops. Orla Jenkins of HIQA received the Janssen Bursary Medal for academic excellence in health economics. Janssen also…

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Left Ventricular Size Predicts Dysfunction in Infant Ventricular Septal Defects

A study published in Pediatric Cardiology found that infants with elevated left ventricular internal dimensions (LVIDd) prior to ventricular septal defect (VSD) repair are at risk for postoperative left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD). Postoperative LVSD is common in these patients but resolves within 9 months of surgery. The study, conducted at Arkansas Children’s Hospital, included…

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