Indicators of structural racism tied to prevalence of chronic health conditions

A study led by Dr. Dinushika Mohottige found that neighborhoods with economic shortcomings and higher area deprivation had a higher prevalence of chronic health conditions. The study, conducted in Durham County, North Carolina, explored the relationship between structural racism indicators and chronic kidney disease, diabetes, and hypertension. Results showed that neighborhoods with a lower percentage of white residents, lower economic and racial spatial advantage, and higher area deprivation had a higher prevalence of these health conditions. The study highlighted the need for multi-sector policy efforts to address structural conditions that impact health, particularly in minoritized neighborhoods.

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