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Prognostic value of lactate in cats presented in respiratory distress to the emergency room




doi: 10.3389/fvets.2022.918029.


eCollection 2022.

Affiliations

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Cassandra Gilday et al.


Front Vet Sci.


.

Abstract

Studies demonstrating the prognostic utility of plasma lactate concentration and lactate clearance in cats are limited. The objective of this study was to determine the prognostic utility of plasma lactate concentration upon admission and plasma lactate clearance in cats presented to the emergency room with respiratory distress attributed to underlying cardiac or respiratory disease. Additionally, we sought to determine if plasma lactate concentration on admission was significantly associated with the underlying cause of respiratory distress (cardiac vs. respiratory), type of respiratory disease, and vital parameters. Seventy-one cats presented in respiratory distress to the ER at a university teaching hospital were enrolled in this retrospective study. Admission lactate concentration was not associated with survival, duration of hospitalization, vital parameters, or underlying etiology for respiratory distress. In contrast, lactate clearance was significantly associated with survival and length of hospitalization. While a statistically significant association between lactate clearance and length of hospitalization was identified, this finding lacked clinical significance where an increase in lactate concentration by 1% was associated with an increased length of hospitalization by 11.4 min (p = 0.035). Results of this study suggest that lactate clearance may have prognostic utility in this population of cats. Further studies including the larger population of cats with underlying cardiac or respiratory disease are warranted.


Keywords:

biomarker; emergency; feline; heart failure; hyperlactatemia; lactate clearance; outcome.

Conflict of interest statement

Author LG is a reviewer of the Journal but only participated in the peer review process as an author. The remaining author declares that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as a potential conflict of interest.

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