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DailyMed – HUMIRA- adalimumab kit HUMIRA- adalimumab injection, solution


14.1 Rheumatoid Arthritis

The efficacy and safety of HUMIRA were assessed in five randomized, double-blind studies in patients ≥18 years of age with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) diagnosed according to American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria. Patients had at least 6 swollen and 9 tender joints. HUMIRA was administered subcutaneously in combination with methotrexate (MTX) (12.5 to 25 mg, Studies RA-I, RA-III and RA-V) or as monotherapy (Studies RA-II and RA-V) or with other disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) (Study RA-IV).

Study RA-I evaluated 271 patients who had failed therapy with at least one but no more than four DMARDs and had inadequate response to MTX. Doses of 20, 40 or 80 mg of HUMIRA or placebo were given every other week for 24 weeks.

Study RA-II evaluated 544 patients who had failed therapy with at least one DMARD. Doses of placebo, 20 or 40 mg of HUMIRA were given as monotherapy every other week or weekly for 26 weeks.

Study RA-III evaluated 619 patients who had an inadequate response to MTX. Patients received placebo, 40 mg of HUMIRA every other week with placebo injections on alternate weeks, or 20 mg of HUMIRA weekly for up to 52 weeks. Study RA-III had an additional primary endpoint at 52 weeks of inhibition of disease progression (as detected by X-ray results). Upon completion of the first 52 weeks, 457 patients enrolled in an open-label extension phase in which 40 mg of HUMIRA was administered every other week for up to 5 years.

Study RA-IV assessed safety in 636 patients who were either DMARD-naive or were permitted to remain on their pre-existing rheumatologic therapy provided that therapy was stable for a minimum of 28 days. Patients were randomized to 40 mg of HUMIRA or placebo every other week for 24 weeks.

Study RA-V evaluated 799 patients with moderately to severely active RA of less than 3 years duration who were ≥18 years old and MTX naïve. Patients were randomized to receive either MTX (optimized to 20 mg/week by week 8), HUMIRA 40 mg every other week or HUMIRA/MTX combination therapy for 104 weeks. Patients were evaluated for signs and symptoms, and for radiographic progression of joint damage. The median disease duration among patients enrolled in the study was 5 months. The median MTX dose achieved was 20 mg.

Clinical Response

The percent of HUMIRA treated patients achieving ACR 20, 50 and 70 responses in Studies RA-II and III are shown in Table 3.

The results of Study RA-I were similar to Study RA-III; patients receiving HUMIRA 40 mg every other week in Study RA-I also achieved ACR 20, 50 and 70 response rates of 65%, 52% and 24%, respectively, compared to placebo responses of 13%, 7% and 3% respectively, at 6 months (p<0.01).

The results of the components of the ACR response criteria for Studies RA-II and RA-III are shown in Table 4. ACR response rates and improvement in all components of ACR response were maintained to week 104. Over the 2 years in Study RA-III, 20% of HUMIRA patients receiving 40 mg every other week achieved a major clinical response, defined as maintenance of an ACR 70 response over a 6-month period. ACR responses were maintained in similar proportions of patients for up to 5 years with continuous HUMIRA treatment in the open-label portion of Study RA-III.

The time course of ACR 20 response for Study RA-III is shown in Figure 1.

In Study RA-III, 85% of patients with ACR 20 responses at week 24 maintained the response at 52 weeks. The time course of ACR 20 response for Study RA-I and Study RA-II were similar.

Figure 1. Study RA-III ACR 20 Responses over 52 Weeks

In Study RA-IV, 53% of patients treated with HUMIRA 40 mg every other week plus standard of care had an ACR 20 response at week 24 compared to 35% on placebo plus standard of care (p<0.001). No unique adverse reactions related to the combination of HUMIRA (adalimumab) and other DMARDs were observed.

In Study RA-V with MTX naïve patients with recent onset RA, the combination treatment with HUMIRA plus MTX led to greater percentages of patients achieving ACR responses than either MTX monotherapy or HUMIRA monotherapy at Week 52 and responses were sustained at Week 104 (see Table 5).

At Week 52, all individual components of the ACR response criteria for Study RA-V improved in the HUMIRA/MTX group and improvements were maintained to Week 104.

Radiographic Response

In Study RA-III, structural joint damage was assessed radiographically and expressed as change in Total Sharp Score (TSS) and its components, the erosion score and Joint Space Narrowing (JSN) score, at month 12 compared to baseline. At baseline, the median TSS was approximately 55 in the placebo and 40 mg every other week groups. The results are shown in Table 6. HUMIRA/MTX treated patients demonstrated less radiographic progression than patients receiving MTX alone at 52 weeks.

In the open-label extension of Study RA-III, 77% of the original patients treated with any dose of HUMIRA were evaluated radiographically at 2 years. Patients maintained inhibition of structural damage, as measured by the TSS. Fifty-four percent had no progression of structural damage as defined by a change in the TSS of zero or less. Fifty-five percent (55%) of patients originally treated with 40 mg HUMIRA every other week have been evaluated radiographically at 5 years. Patients had continued inhibition of structural damage with 50% showing no progression of structural damage defined by a change in the TSS of zero or less.

In Study RA-V, structural joint damage was assessed as in Study RA-III. Greater inhibition of radiographic progression, as assessed by changes in TSS, erosion score and JSN was observed in the HUMIRA/MTX combination group as compared to either the MTX or HUMIRA monotherapy group at Week 52 as well as at Week 104 (see Table 7).

Physical Function Response

In studies RA-I through IV, HUMIRA showed significantly greater improvement than placebo in the disability index of Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ-DI) from baseline to the end of study, and significantly greater improvement than placebo in the health-outcomes as assessed by The Short Form Health Survey (SF 36). Improvement was seen in both the Physical Component Summary (PCS) and the Mental Component Summary (MCS).

In Study RA-III, the mean (95% CI) improvement in HAQ-DI from baseline at week 52 was 0.60 (0.55, 0.65) for the HUMIRA patients and 0.25 (0.17, 0.33) for placebo/MTX (p<0.001) patients. Sixty-three percent of HUMIRA-treated patients achieved a 0.5 or greater improvement in HAQ-DI at week 52 in the double-blind portion of the study. Eighty-two percent of these patients maintained that improvement through week 104 and a similar proportion of patients maintained this response through week 260 (5 years) of open-label treatment. Mean improvement in the SF-36 was maintained through the end of measurement at week 156 (3 years).

In Study RA-V, the HAQ-DI and the physical component of the SF-36 showed greater improvement (p<0.001) for the HUMIRA/MTX combination therapy group versus either the MTX monotherapy or the HUMIRA monotherapy group at Week 52, which was maintained through Week 104.

14.2 Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

The safety and efficacy of HUMIRA was assessed in two studies (Studies JIA-I and JIA-II) in patients with active polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).

Study JIA-I

The safety and efficacy of HUMIRA were assessed in a multicenter, randomized, withdrawal, double-blind, parallel-group study in 171 patients who were 4 to 17 years of age with polyarticular JIA. In the study, the patients were stratified into two groups: MTX-treated or non-MTX-treated. All patients had to show signs of active moderate or severe disease despite previous treatment with NSAIDs, analgesics, corticosteroids, or DMARDS. Patients who received prior treatment with any biologic DMARDS were excluded from the study.

The study included four phases: an open-label lead in phase (OL-LI; 16 weeks), a double-blind randomized withdrawal phase (DB; 32 weeks), an open-label extension phase (OLE-BSA; up to 136 weeks), and an open-label fixed dose phase (OLE-FD; 16 weeks). In the first three phases of the study, HUMIRA was administered based on body surface area at a dose of 24 mg/m2 up to a maximum total body dose of 40 mg subcutaneously (SC) every other week. In the OLE-FD phase, the patients were treated with 20 mg of HUMIRA SC every other week if their weight was less than 30 kg and with 40 mg of HUMIRA SC every other week if their weight was 30 kg or greater. Patients remained on stable doses of NSAIDs and or prednisone (≤0.2 mg/kg/day or 10 mg/day maximum).

Patients demonstrating a Pediatric ACR 30 response at the end of OL-LI phase were randomized into the double blind (DB) phase of the study and received either HUMIRA or placebo every other week for 32 weeks or until disease flare. Disease flare was defined as a worsening of ≥30% from baseline in ≥3 of 6 Pediatric ACR core criteria, ≥2 active joints, and improvement of >30% in no more than 1 of the 6 criteria. After 32 weeks or at the time of disease flare during the DB phase, patients were treated in the open-label extension phase based on the BSA regimen (OLE-BSA), before converting to a fixed dose regimen based on body weight (OLE-FD phase).

Study JIA-I Clinical Response

At the end of the 16-week OL-LI phase, 94% of the patients in the MTX stratum and 74% of the patients in the non-MTX stratum were Pediatric ACR 30 responders. In the DB phase significantly fewer patients who received HUMIRA experienced disease flare compared to placebo, both without MTX (43% vs. 71%) and with MTX (37% vs. 65%). More patients treated with HUMIRA continued to show pediatric ACR 30/50/70 responses at Week 48 compared to patients treated with placebo. Pediatric ACR responses were maintained for up to two years in the OLE phase in patients who received HUMIRA throughout the study.

Study JIA-II

HUMIRA was assessed in an open-label, multicenter study in 32 patients who were 2 to <4 years of age or 4 years of age and older weighing <15 kg with moderately to severely active polyarticular JIA. Most patients (97%) received at least 24 weeks of HUMIRA treatment dosed 24 mg/m2 up to a maximum of 20 mg every other week as a single SC injection up to a maximum of 120 weeks duration. During the study, most patients used concomitant MTX, with fewer reporting use of corticosteroids or NSAIDs. The primary objective of the study was evaluation of safety [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)].

14.3 Psoriatic Arthritis

The safety and efficacy of HUMIRA was assessed in two randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled studies in 413 patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Upon completion of both studies, 383 patients enrolled in an open-label extension study, in which 40 mg HUMIRA was administered every other week.

Study PsA-I enrolled 313 adult patients with moderately to severely active PsA (>3 swollen and >3 tender joints) who had an inadequate response to NSAID therapy in one of the following forms: (1) distal interphalangeal (DIP) involvement (N=23); (2) polyarticular arthritis (absence of rheumatoid nodules and presence of plaque psoriasis) (N=210); (3) arthritis mutilans (N=1); (4) asymmetric PsA (N=77); or (5) AS-like (N=2). Patients on MTX therapy (158 of 313 patients) at enrollment (stable dose of ≤30 mg/week for >1 month) could continue MTX at the same dose. Doses of HUMIRA 40 mg or placebo every other week were administered during the 24-week double-blind period of the study.

Compared to placebo, treatment with HUMIRA resulted in improvements in the measures of disease activity (see Tables 8 and 9). Among patients with PsA who received HUMIRA, the clinical responses were apparent in some patients at the time of the first visit (two weeks) and were maintained up to 88 weeks in the ongoing open-label study. Similar responses were seen in patients with each of the subtypes of psoriatic arthritis, although few patients were enrolled with the arthritis mutilans and ankylosing spondylitis-like subtypes. Responses were similar in patients who were or were not receiving concomitant MTX therapy at baseline.

Patients with psoriatic involvement of at least three percent body surface area (BSA) were evaluated for Psoriatic Area and Severity Index (PASI) responses. At 24 weeks, the proportions of patients achieving a 75% or 90% improvement in the PASI were 59% and 42% respectively, in the HUMIRA group (N=69), compared to 1% and 0% respectively, in the placebo group (N=69) (p<0.001). PASI responses were apparent in some patients at the time of the first visit (two weeks). Responses were similar in patients who were or were not receiving concomitant MTX therapy at baseline.

Similar results were seen in an additional, 12-week study in 100 patients with moderate to severe psoriatic arthritis who had suboptimal response to DMARD therapy as manifested by ≥3 tender joints and ≥3 swollen joints at enrollment.

Radiographic Response

Radiographic changes were assessed in the PsA studies. Radiographs of hands, wrists, and feet were obtained at baseline and Week 24 during the double-blind period when patients were on HUMIRA or placebo and at Week 48 when all patients were on open-label HUMIRA. A modified Total Sharp Score (mTSS), which included distal interphalangeal joints (i.e., not identical to the TSS used for rheumatoid arthritis), was used by readers blinded to treatment group to assess the radiographs.

HUMIRA-treated patients demonstrated greater inhibition of radiographic progression compared to placebo-treated patients and this effect was maintained at 48 weeks (see Table 10).

Physical Function Response

In Study PsA-I, physical function and disability were assessed using the HAQ Disability Index (HAQ-DI) and the SF-36 Health Survey. Patients treated with 40 mg of HUMIRA every other week showed greater improvement from baseline in the HAQ-DI score (mean decreases of 47% and 49% at Weeks 12 and 24 respectively) in comparison to placebo (mean decreases of 1% and 3% at Weeks 12 and 24 respectively). At Weeks 12 and 24, patients treated with HUMIRA showed greater improvement from baseline in the SF-36 Physical Component Summary score compared to patients treated with placebo, and no worsening in the SF-36 Mental Component Summary score. Improvement in physical function based on the HAQ-DI was maintained for up to 84 weeks through the open-label portion of the study.

14.4 Ankylosing Spondylitis

The safety and efficacy of HUMIRA 40 mg every other week was assessed in 315 adult patients in a randomized, 24 week double-blind, placebo-controlled study in patients with active ankylosing spondylitis (AS) who had an inadequate response to glucocorticoids, NSAIDs, analgesics, methotrexate or sulfasalazine. Active AS was defined as patients who fulfilled at least two of the following three criteria: (1) a Bath AS disease activity index (BASDAI) score ≥4 cm, (2) a visual analog score (VAS) for total back pain ≥ 40 mm, and (3) morning stiffness ≥ 1 hour. The blinded period was followed by an open-label period during which patients received HUMIRA 40 mg every other week subcutaneously for up to an additional 28 weeks.

Improvement in measures of disease activity was first observed at Week 2 and maintained through 24 weeks as shown in Figure 2 and Table 11.

Responses of patients with total spinal ankylosis (n=11) were similar to those without total ankylosis.

Title: fig2-asas20-response

Figure 2. ASAS 20 Response By Visit, Study AS-I

At 12 weeks, the ASAS 20/50/70 responses were achieved by 58%, 38%, and 23%, respectively, of patients receiving HUMIRA, compared to 21%, 10%, and 5% respectively, of patients receiving placebo (p <0.001). Similar responses were seen at Week 24 and were sustained in patients receiving open-label HUMIRA for up to 52 weeks.

A greater proportion of patients treated with HUMIRA (22%) achieved a low level of disease activity at 24 weeks (defined as a value <20 [on a scale of 0 to 100 mm] in each of the four ASAS response parameters) compared to patients treated with placebo (6%).

A second randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 82 patients with ankylosing spondylitis showed similar results.

Patients treated with HUMIRA achieved improvement from baseline in the Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (ASQoL) score (-3.6 vs. -1.1) and in the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) Physical Component Summary (PCS) score (7.4 vs. 1.9) compared to placebo-treated patients at Week 24.

14.5 Adult Crohn’s Disease

The safety and efficacy of multiple doses of HUMIRA were assessed in adult patients with moderately to severely active Crohn’s disease, CD, (Crohn’s Disease Activity Index (CDAI) ≥ 220 and ≤ 450) in randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies. Concomitant stable doses of aminosalicylates, corticosteroids, and/or immunomodulatory agents were permitted, and 79% of patients continued to receive at least one of these medications.

Induction of clinical remission (defined as CDAI < 150) was evaluated in two studies. In Study CD-I, 299 TNF-blocker naïve patients were randomized to one of four treatment groups: the placebo group received placebo at Weeks 0 and 2, the 160/80 group received 160 mg HUMIRA at Week 0 and 80 mg at Week 2, the 80/40 group received 80 mg at Week 0 and 40 mg at Week 2, and the 40/20 group received 40 mg at Week 0 and 20 mg at Week 2. Clinical results were assessed at Week 4.

In the second induction study, Study CD-II, 325 patients who had lost response to, or were intolerant to, previous infliximab therapy were randomized to receive either 160 mg HUMIRA at Week 0 and 80 mg at Week 2, or placebo at Weeks 0 and 2. Clinical results were assessed at Week 4.

Maintenance of clinical remission was evaluated in Study CD-III. In this study, 854 patients with active disease received open-label HUMIRA, 80 mg at week 0 and 40 mg at Week 2. Patients were then randomized at Week 4 to 40 mg HUMIRA every other week, 40 mg HUMIRA every week, or placebo. The total study duration was 56 weeks. Patients in clinical response (decrease in CDAI ≥70) at Week 4 were stratified and analyzed separately from those not in clinical response at Week 4.

Induction of Clinical Remission

A greater percentage of the patients treated with 160/80 mg HUMIRA achieved induction of clinical remission versus placebo at Week 4 regardless of whether the patients were TNF blocker naïve (CD-I), or had lost response to or were intolerant to infliximab (CD-II) (see Table 12).

Maintenance of Clinical Remission

In Study CD-III at Week 4, 58% (499/854) of patients were in clinical response and were assessed in the primary analysis. At Weeks 26 and 56, greater proportions of patients who were in clinical response at Week 4 achieved clinical remission in the HUMIRA 40 mg every other week maintenance group compared to patients in the placebo maintenance group (see Table 13). The group that received HUMIRA therapy every week did not demonstrate significantly higher remission rates compared to the group that received HUMIRA every other week.

Of those in response at Week 4 who attained remission during the study, patients in the HUMIRA every other week group maintained remission for a longer time than patients in the placebo maintenance group. Among patients who were not in response by Week 12, therapy continued beyond 12 weeks did not result in significantly more responses.

14.6 Pediatric Crohn’s Disease

A randomized, double-blind, 52-week clinical study of 2 dose concentrations of HUMIRA (Study PCD-I) was conducted in 192 pediatric patients (6 to 17 years of age) with moderately to severely active Crohn’s disease (defined as Pediatric Crohn’s Disease Activity Index (PCDAI) score > 30). Enrolled patients had over the previous two year period an inadequate response to corticosteroids or an immunomodulator (i.e., azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, or methotrexate). Patients who had previously received a TNF blocker were allowed to enroll if they had previously had loss of response or intolerance to that TNF blocker.

Patients received open-label induction therapy at a dose based on their body weight (≥40 kg and <40 kg). Patients weighing ≥40 kg received 160 mg (at Week 0) and 80 mg (at Week 2). Patients weighing <40 kg received 80 mg (at Week 0) and 40 mg (at Week 2). At Week 4, patients within each body weight category (≥40 kg and <40 kg) were randomized 1:1 to one of two maintenance dose regimens (high dose and low dose). The high dose was 40 mg every other week for patients weighing ≥40 kg and 20 mg every other week for patients weighing <40 kg. The low dose was 20 mg every other week for patients weighing ≥40 kg and 10 mg every other week for patients weighing <40 kg.

Concomitant stable dosages of corticosteroids (prednisone dosage ≤40 mg/day or equivalent) and immunomodulators (azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, or methotrexate) were permitted throughout the study.

At Week 12, patients who experienced a disease flare (increase in PCDAI of ≥ 15 from Week 4 and absolute PCDAI > 30) or who were non-responders (did not achieve a decrease in the PCDAI of ≥ 15 from baseline for 2 consecutive visits at least 2 weeks apart) were allowed to dose-escalate (i.e., switch from blinded every other week dosing to blinded every week dosing); patients who dose-escalated were considered treatment failures.

At baseline, 38% of patients were receiving corticosteroids, and 62% of patients were receiving an immunomodulator. Forty-four percent (44%) of patients had previously lost response or were intolerant to a TNF blocker. The median baseline PCDAI score was 40.

Of the 192 patients total, 188 patients completed the 4 week induction period, 152 patients completed 26 weeks of treatment, and 124 patients completed 52 weeks of treatment. Fifty-one percent (51%) (48/95) of patients in the low maintenance dose group dose-escalated, and 38% (35/93) of patients in the high maintenance dose group dose-escalated.

At Week 4, 28% (52/188) of patients were in clinical remission (defined as PCDAI ≤ 10).

The proportions of patients in clinical remission (defined as PCDAI ≤ 10) and clinical response (defined as reduction in PCDAI of at least 15 points from baseline) were assessed at Weeks 26 and 52.

At both Weeks 26 and 52, the proportion of patients in clinical remission and clinical response was numerically higher in the high dose group compared to the low dose group (Table 14). The recommended maintenance regimen is 20 mg every other week for patients weighing < 40 kg and 40 mg every other week for patients weighing ≥ 40 kg. Every week dosing is not the recommended maintenance dosing regimen [see Dosage and Administration (2.3)].

14.7 Adult Ulcerative Colitis

The safety and efficacy of HUMIRA were assessed in adult patients with moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis (Mayo score 6 to 12 on a 12 point scale, with an endoscopy subscore of 2 to 3 on a scale of 0 to 3) despite concurrent or prior treatment with immunosuppressants such as corticosteroids, azathioprine, or 6-MP in two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical studies (Studies UC-I and UC-II). Both studies enrolled TNF-blocker naïve patients, but Study UC-II also allowed entry of patients who lost response to or were intolerant to TNF-blockers. Forty percent (40%) of patients enrolled in Study UC-II had previously used another TNF-blocker.

Concomitant stable doses of aminosalicylates and immunosuppressants were permitted. In Studies UC-I and II, patients were receiving aminosalicylates (69%), corticosteroids (59%) and/or azathioprine or 6-MP (37%) at baseline. In both studies, 92% of patients received at least one of these medications.

Induction of clinical remission (defined as Mayo score ≤ 2 with no individual subscores > 1) at Week 8 was evaluated in both studies. Clinical remission at Week 52 and sustained clinical remission (defined as clinical remission at both Weeks 8 and 52) were evaluated in Study UC-II.

In Study UC-I, 390 TNF-blocker naïve patients were randomized to one of three treatment groups for the primary efficacy analysis. The placebo group received placebo at Weeks 0, 2, 4 and 6. The 160/80 group received 160 mg HUMIRA at Week 0 and 80 mg at Week 2, and the 80/40 group received 80 mg HUMIRA at Week 0 and 40 mg at Week 2. After Week 2, patients in both HUMIRA treatment groups received 40 mg every other week.

In Study UC-II, 518 patients were randomized to receive either HUMIRA 160 mg at Week 0, 80 mg at Week 2, and 40 mg every other week starting at Week 4 through Week 50, or placebo starting at Week 0 and every other week through Week 50. Corticosteroid taper was permitted starting at Week 8.

In both Studies UC-I and UC-II, a greater percentage of the patients treated with 160/80 mg of HUMIRA compared to patients treated with placebo achieved induction of clinical remission. In Study UC-II, a greater percentage of the patients treated with 160/80 mg of HUMIRA compared to patients treated with placebo achieved sustained clinical remission (clinical remission at both Weeks 8 and 52) (Table 15).

In Study UC-I, there was no statistically significant difference in clinical remission observed between the HUMIRA 80/40 mg group and the placebo group at Week 8.

In Study UC-II, 17.3% (43/248) in the HUMIRA group were in clinical remission at Week 52 compared to 8.5% (21/246) in the placebo group (treatment difference: 8.8%; 95% confidence interval (CI): [2.8%, 14.5%]; p<0.05).

In the subgroup of patients in Study UC-II with prior TNF-blocker use, the treatment difference for induction of clinical remission appeared to be lower than that seen in the whole study population, and the treatment differences for sustained clinical remission and clinical remission at Week 52 appeared to be similar to those seen in the whole study population. The subgroup of patients with prior TNF-blocker use achieved induction of clinical remission at 9% (9/98) in the HUMIRA group versus 7% (7/101) in the placebo group, and sustained clinical remission at 5% (5/98) in the HUMIRA group versus 1% (1/101) in the placebo group. In the subgroup of patients with prior TNF-blocker use, 10% (10/98) were in clinical remission at Week 52 in the HUMIRA group versus 3% (3/101) in the placebo group.

14.8 Pediatric Ulcerative Colitis

The safety and efficacy of HUMIRA were assessed in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind trial (Study PUC-I, NCT02065557) in 93 pediatric patients 5 years to 17 years of age with moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis (Mayo score 6 to 12 with endoscopy subscore of 2 to 3 points, confirmed by centrally read endoscopy) who had an inadequate response or intolerance to therapy with corticosteroids and/or an immunomodulator (i.e., azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, or methotrexate). Fifteen out of 93 patients (16%) in the study had prior experience with a TNF blocker. Patients who received corticosteroids at enrollment were allowed to taper their corticosteroid therapy after Week 4.

Seventy-seven patients were initially randomized 3:2 to receive double-blind treatment with one of two dosages of HUMIRA. Patients in both dosage groups received 2.4 mg/kg (maximum of 160 mg) at Week 0, 1.2 mg/kg (maximum of 80 mg) at Week 2, and 0.6 mg/kg (maximum of 40 mg) at Weeks 4 and 6. The higher dosage group also received an additional dosage of 2.4 mg/kg (maximum of 160 mg) at Week 1. Following an amendment to the study design, 16 additional patients were enrolled and received open-label treatment with HUMIRA at the higher dosage.

At Week 8, 62 patients who demonstrated clinical response per Partial Mayo Score (PMS; a subset of the Mayo score with no endoscopic component and defined as a decrease in PMS ≥ 2 points and ≥ 30% from baseline) were randomized equally to receive double-blind treatment with HUMIRA 0.6 mg/kg (maximum of 40 mg) every other week (lower dosage group), or 0.6 mg/kg (maximum of 40 mg) every week (higher dosage group). Prior to an amendment to the study design, 12 additional patients who demonstrated clinical response per PMS were randomized to receive placebo.

There are no anticipated clinically relevant differences in efficacy between the studied higher dosage administered during the 52-week PUC-I trial and the recommended dosage of HUMIRA [see Dosage and Administration (2.4), Clinical Pharmacology (12.2)].

Patients who met criteria for disease flare at or after Week 12 were randomized to receive a re-induction dose of 2.4 mg/kg (maximum of 160 mg) or a dose of 0.6 mg/kg (maximum of 40 mg) and then continued the dose to which they were randomized at Week 8.

The co-primary endpoints of the study were clinical remission per PMS (defined as PMS ≤ 2 and no individual subscore > 1) at Week 8, and clinical remission per the Mayo Score (defined as Mayo Score ≤ 2 and no individual subscore > 1) at Week 52 in patients who achieved clinical response per PMS at Week 8.  Secondary endpoints included Mayo Score response (defined as a decrease in Mayo Score of ≥ 3 points and ≥ 30% from baseline) at Week 52 in Week 8 PMS responders, endoscopic improvement (defined as a Mayo endoscopy subscore ≤ 1) at Week 52 in Week 8 PMS responders, and Mayo Score remission at Week 52 in Week 8 PMS remitters. 

Week 8 Results

At Week 8, PMS remission was achieved by 60% [28/47; 95% confidence interval (CI): (44%, 74%)] of patients in the higher dosage group (not including the 16 patients receiving open-label higher dosage) and 43% [13/30; 95% CI: (25%, 63%)] of patients in the lower dosage group. Results from the higher dosage group are representative of the results expected with the recommended dosage [see Dosage and Administration (2.4), Clinical Pharmacology (12.2)].  

Week 52 Results

At Week 52, endpoints were assessed in the population of patients who received double-blind placebo, HUMIRA 0.6 mg/kg (maximum of 40 mg) every other week, or HUMIRA 0.6 mg/kg (maximum of 40 mg) every week between Week 8 and Week 52 (Table 16).

14.9 Plaque Psoriasis

The safety and efficacy of HUMIRA were assessed in randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies in 1696 adult subjects with moderate to severe chronic plaque psoriasis (Ps) who were candidates for systemic therapy or phototherapy.

Study Ps-I evaluated 1212 subjects with chronic Ps with ≥10% body surface area (BSA) involvement, Physician’s Global Assessment (PGA) of at least moderate disease severity, and Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) ≥12 within three treatment periods. In period A, subjects received placebo or HUMIRA at an initial dose of 80 mg at Week 0 followed by a dose of 40 mg every other week starting at Week 1. After 16 weeks of therapy, subjects who achieved at least a PASI 75 response at Week 16, defined as a PASI score improvement of at least 75% relative to baseline, entered period B and received open-label 40 mg HUMIRA every other week. After 17 weeks of open label therapy, subjects who maintained at least a PASI 75 response at Week 33 and were originally randomized to active therapy in period A were re-randomized in period C to receive 40 mg HUMIRA every other week or placebo for an additional 19 weeks. Across all treatment groups the mean baseline PASI score was 19 and the baseline Physician’s Global Assessment score ranged from “moderate” (53%) to “severe” (41%) to “very severe” (6%).

Study Ps-II evaluated 99 subjects randomized to HUMIRA and 48 subjects randomized to placebo with chronic plaque psoriasis with ≥10% BSA involvement and PASI ≥12. Subjects received placebo, or an initial dose of 80 mg HUMIRA at Week 0 followed by 40 mg every other week starting at Week 1 for 16 weeks. Across all treatment groups the mean baseline PASI score was 21 and the baseline PGA score ranged from “moderate” (41%) to “severe” (51%) to “very severe” (8%).

Studies Ps-I and II evaluated the proportion of subjects who achieved “clear” or “minimal” disease on the 6-point PGA scale and the proportion of subjects who achieved a reduction in PASI score of at least 75% (PASI 75) from baseline at Week 16 (see Table 17 and 18).

Additionally, Study Ps-I evaluated the proportion of subjects who maintained a PGA of “clear” or “minimal” disease or a PASI 75 response after Week 33 and on or before Week 52.

Additionally, in Study Ps-I, subjects on HUMIRA who maintained a PASI 75 were re-randomized to HUMIRA (N = 250) or placebo (N = 240) at Week 33. After 52 weeks of treatment with HUMIRA, more subjects on HUMIRA maintained efficacy when compared to subjects who were re-randomized to placebo based on maintenance of PGA of “clear” or “minimal” disease (68% vs. 28%) or a PASI 75 (79% vs. 43%).

A total of 347 stable responders participated in a withdrawal and retreatment evaluation in an open-label extension study. Median time to relapse (decline to PGA “moderate” or worse) was approximately 5 months. During the withdrawal period, no subject experienced transformation to either pustular or erythrodermic psoriasis. A total of 178 subjects who relapsed re-initiated treatment with 80 mg of HUMIRA, then 40 mg every other week beginning at week 1. At week 16, 69% (123/178) of subjects had a response of PGA “clear” or “minimal”.

A randomized, double-blind study (Study Ps-III) compared the efficacy and safety of HUMIRA versus placebo in 217 adult subjects. Subjects in the study had to have chronic plaque psoriasis of at least moderate severity on the PGA scale, fingernail involvement of at least moderate severity on a 5-point Physician’s Global Assessment of Fingernail Psoriasis (PGA-F) scale, a Modified Nail Psoriasis Severity Index (mNAPSI) score for the target-fingernail of ≥ 8, and either a BSA involvement of at least 10% or a BSA involvement of at least 5% with a total mNAPSI score for all fingernails of ≥ 20. Subjects received an initial dose of 80 mg HUMIRA followed by 40 mg every other week (starting one week after the initial dose) or placebo for 26 weeks followed by open-label HUMIRA treatment for an additional 26 weeks. This study evaluated the proportion of subjects who achieved “clear” or “minimal” assessment with at least a 2-grade improvement on the PGA-F scale and the proportion of subjects who achieved at least a 75% improvement from baseline in the mNAPSI score (mNAPSI 75) at Week 26.

At Week 26, a higher proportion of subjects in the HUMIRA group than in the placebo group achieved the PGA-F endpoint. Furthermore, a higher proportion of subjects in the HUMIRA group than in the placebo group achieved mNAPSI 75 at Week 26 (see Table 19).

Nail pain was also evaluated and improvement in nail pain was observed in Study Ps-III.

14.10 Hidradenitis Suppurativa

Two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies (Studies HS-I and II) evaluated the safety and efficacy of HUMIRA in a total of 633 adult subjects with moderate to severe hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) with Hurley Stage II or III disease and with at least 3 abscesses or inflammatory nodules. In both studies, subjects received placebo or HUMIRA at an initial dose of 160 mg at Week 0, 80 mg at Week 2, and 40 mg every week starting at Week 4 and continued through Week 11. Subjects used topical antiseptic wash daily. Concomitant oral antibiotic use was allowed in Study HS-II.

Both studies evaluated Hidradenitis Suppurativa Clinical Response (HiSCR) at Week 12. HiSCR was defined as at least a 50% reduction in total abscess and inflammatory nodule count with no increase in abscess count and no increase in draining fistula count relative to baseline (see Table 18). Reduction in HS-related skin pain was assessed using a Numeric Rating Scale in patients who entered the study with an initial baseline score of 3 or greater on a 11 point scale.

In both studies, a higher proportion of HUMIRA- than placebo-treated subjects achieved HiSCR (see Table 20).

In both studies, from Week 12 to Week 35 (Period B), subjects who had received HUMIRA were re-randomized to 1 of 3 treatment groups (HUMIRA 40 mg every week, HUMIRA 40 mg every other week, or placebo). Subjects who had been randomized to placebo were assigned to receive HUMIRA 40 mg every week (Study HS-I) or placebo (Study HS-II).

During Period B, flare of HS, defined as ≥25% increase from baseline in abscesses and inflammatory nodule counts and with a minimum of 2 additional lesions, was documented in 22 (22%) of the 100 subjects who were withdrawn from HUMIRA treatment following the primary efficacy timepoint in two studies.

14.11 Adult Uveitis

The safety and efficacy of HUMIRA were assessed in adult patients with non-infectious intermediate, posterior and panuveitis excluding patients with isolated anterior uveitis, in two randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled studies (UV I and II). Patients received placebo or HUMIRA at an initial dose of 80 mg followed by 40 mg every other week starting one week after the initial dose. The primary efficacy endpoint in both studies was ´time to treatment failure´.

Treatment failure was a multi-component outcome defined as the development of new inflammatory chorioretinal and/or inflammatory retinal vascular lesions, an increase in anterior chamber (AC) cell grade or vitreous haze (VH) grade or a decrease in best corrected visual acuity (BCVA).

Study UV I evaluated 217 patients with active uveitis while being treated with corticosteroids (oral prednisone at a dose of 10 to 60 mg/day). All patients received a standardized dose of prednisone 60 mg/day at study entry followed by a mandatory taper schedule, with complete corticosteroid discontinuation by Week 15.

Study UV II evaluated 226 patients with inactive uveitis while being treated with corticosteroids (oral prednisone 10 to 35 mg/day) at baseline to control their disease. Patients subsequently underwent a mandatory taper schedule, with complete corticosteroid discontinuation by Week 19.

Clinical Response

Results from both studies demonstrated statistically significant reduction of the risk of treatment failure in patients treated with HUMIRA versus patients receiving placebo. In both studies, all components of the primary endpoint contributed cumulatively to the overall difference between HUMIRA and placebo groups (Table 21).

Title: km-graph-fig3-study-uv-i

Figure 3: Kaplan-Meier Curves Summarizing Time to Treatment Failure on or after Week 6 (Study UV I) or Week 2 (Study UV II)

Study UV I

Title: uveitis-km-fig3-part2

Study UV II

Note: P# = Placebo (Number of Events/Number at Risk); A# = HUMIRA (Number of Events/Number at Risk).



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