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The rising burden of inflammatory bowel disease in Denmark over two decades: a nationwide cohort study


Footnotes

Conflict of interest statement: The corresponding author confirms on behalf of all authors that there have been no involvements that might raise the question of bias in the work reported or in the conclusions, implications, or opinions stated.

MA reports no conflict of interest.

HC reports no conflict of interest.

MB reports no conflict of interest.

JFC reports receiving research grants from AbbVie, Janssen Pharmaceuticals and Takeda; receiving payment for lectures from AbbVie, Amgen, Allergan, Inc. Ferring Pharmaceuticals, Shire, and Takeda; receiving consulting fees from AbbVie, Amgen, Arena Pharmaceuticals, Boehringer Ingelheim, Bristol Myers Squibb, Celgene Corporation, Eli Lilly, Ferring Pharmaceuticals, Galmed Research, Glaxo Smith Kline, Geneva, Iterative Scopes, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Kaleido Biosciences, Landos, Otsuka, Pfizer, Prometheus, Sanofi, Takeda, TiGenix,; and hold stock options in Intestinal Biotech Development.

TJ reports no conflict of interest.

KHA reports no conflict of interest.

Funding sources: Danish National Research Foundation, grant no. DNRF148. MA is supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (K23DK129762-01).

JFC is supported by Mount Sinai (New York) SUCCESS fund.

Data Availability Statement: The data underlying this article are available in the article and in its online supplementary material.

Author contributions: MA: study concept and design, interpretation of data, drafting and critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content; HC: study design; acquisition, analysis and interpretation of data, critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content; MB: interpretation of data, critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content; JFC: interpretation of data, critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content; TJ: study concept and design, interpretation of data, critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content; KHA: study concept and design, interpretation of data, critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content.

Data transparency statement: The study is based on data from the Danish nationwide registers (https://sundhedsdatastyrelsen.dk). The register data is protected by the Danish Act on Processing of Personal Data and are accessed through application to and approval from the Danish Data Protection Agency and the Danish Health Data Authority.

Acknowledgements: The authors thank Jill Gregory, Certified Medical Illustrator, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, for the graphical abstract illustration.

What you need to know

BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT

The global IBD epidemiology is changing, with reported rise in IBD incidence in eastern, and compounding prevalence in western countries. However, confirmatory data are lacking.

NEW FINDINGS

Using Danish nationwide data, we report that IBD incidence and prevalence have increased and that the IBD population has shifted towards an older age in the last two decades.

LIMITATIONS

Limitations include the use of administrative data secondarily for the purpose of research, lack of data on disease phenotype and location, and limited generalizability to other populations.

IMPACT

These findings call for preparation of healthcare systems and research strategies to accommodate older patients and carry implications towards better understanding of environmental IBD risk factors.

Lay Summary

Using Danish nationwide data with follow up over two decades, we report that IBD incidence and prevalence are increasing and that the IBD population is shifting towards an older age.



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