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An Update on the Potential Application of Herbal Medicine in Promoting Angiogenesis



Review


doi: 10.3389/fphar.2022.928817.


eCollection 2022.

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Review

Jingjing Li et al.


Front Pharmacol.


.

Abstract

Angiogenesis, the formation of new capillaries from pre-existing vascular networks, plays an important role in many physiological and pathological processes. The use of pro-angiogenic agents has been proposed as an attractive approach for promoting wound healing and treating vascular insufficiency-related problems, such as ischemic heart disease and stroke, which are the leading causes of death worldwide. Traditional herbal medicine has a long history; however, there is still a need for more in-depth studies and evidence-based confirmation from controlled and validated trials. Many in vitro and in vivo studies have reported that herbal medicines and their bioactive ingredients exert pro-angiogenic activity. The most frequently studied pro-angiogenic phytochemicals include ginsenosides from Panax notoginseng, astragalosides and calycosin from Radix Astragali, salvianolic acid B from Salvia miltiorrhiza, paeoniflorin from Radix Paeoniae, ilexsaponin A1 from Ilex pubescens, ferulic acid from Angelica sinensis, and puerarin from Radix puerariae. This review summarizes the progress in research on these phytochemicals, particularly those related to pro-angiogenic mechanisms and applications in ischemic diseases, tissue repair, and wound healing. In addition, an outline of their limitations and challenges during drug development is presented.


Keywords:

herbal medicine; ischemic diseases; phytochemicals; pro-angiogenic; wound healing.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as a potential conflict of interest.

Figures



FIGURE 1

Schematic illustration of VEGFR-2 signaling pathways. Stimulation of VEGFR-2 by VEGF-A induces dimerization and autophosphorylation of specific intracellular tyrosine residues. Subsequently, the activation of the downstream signal transduction pathways induces the proliferation, migration, and survival of endothelial cells, and increases vascular permeability.


FIGURE 2


FIGURE 2

Chemical structures of the major pro-angiogenic phytochemicals mentioned in this review.


FIGURE 3


FIGURE 3

Summarized findings of pro-angiogenic phytochemicals for ischemic diseases, tissue repairing, and wound healing. Bioactive compounds or crude extracts of Panax notoginseng, Radix Astragali, Salvia miltiorrhiza, Radix Paeoniae, Ilex pubescens, Angelica sinensis, and Radix puerariae with pro-angiogenic activities show potential applications in treating ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, diabetic ulcer, and wound healing. PNS, Panax notoginseng saponins; SME, Salvia miltiorrhiza extract; SAA, Salvianolic acid A; ASE, Angelica sinensis extract.

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