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Novel Technique for Cardiac Monitor Implantation in Pediatrics




doi: 10.1007/s00246-022-02974-1.


Online ahead of print.

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Peter Woolman et al.


Pediatr Cardiol.


.

Abstract

Implantable cardiac monitors (ICM) allow for symptom-rhythm correlation. Current manufacturer recommendations call for implantation of ICMs diagonally in the left anterior chest. Complications such as skin tenting and device erosion have occurred using this technique in pediatric patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of implanting ICMs via new vertical-parasternal technique (VP) compared to manufacturer-recommended diagonal technique (D) in pediatric patients. Single-center, IRB-approved retrospective study of pediatric patients that underwent ICM implantation from 01/01/2017 to 12/01/2021. All implants were performed after informed consent, under sterile conditions in the electrophysiology laboratory. Data collected included demographics, implant orientation (VP or D), complications, device type, presence of P-wave, and measurement of R-wave amplitude at implantation and follow-up. ICMs were implanted in 34 patients without congenital heart disease. Initial R-wave amplitude average for VP 1.00, D 0.99 (p = NS). Follow-up R-wave amplitude was 0.97 VP and 0.93 for D (p = NS). Median follow-up period for VP was 11 and for D was 20 months (p = NS). D cohort had only post-procedural complication due to skin tenting of the ICM in child < 2.5 years of age. No skin tenting, erosions, or complications occurred in the vertical-parasternal implant technique. Vertical-Parasternal ICM implantation is as safe and effective as the manufacturer-recommended diagonal implant. Short- and long-term data demonstrate an equivalent R-wave detection and no significant signal deterioration, even in very young children. No skin tenting, erosions, or complications occurred in the vertical parasternal implant technique.

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