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The relationship between diabetes and carotid artery calcifications detected via dental cone-beam computed tomography in patients undergoing implant treatment planning



Background:

The authors investigated the association between carotid artery calcifications (CACs) detected incidentally on dental cone-beam computed tomographic scans and positive diabetes status.


Methods:

Two patient groups were identified retrospectively from a patient database: positive for CACs based on cone-beam computed tomographic scans and positive diabetes status. In addition to demographic characteristics, data including diabetes status and presence, type, and absence of CACs were obtained. A χ2 statistical analysis was completed by means of dividing the data into sets of known CAC and known history of diabetes; significance level was P < .05.


Results:

To satisfy the a priori power analysis, records from 2010 through 2021 were used. For the positive CAC group, data were obtained from 288 patients (171 men, 117 women) and 68 patients (24%) had a positive diabetes status at the time of cone-beam computed tomography (P < .001). There were significantly more male patients (n = 47) than female patients (n = 21) with diabetes (χ2 = 9.9; P = .002). For the positive diabetes group, data were obtained from 225 patients (149 men, 76 women), and 100 patients (44%) had an identifiable CAC. There were significantly more male patients (n = 73) than female patients (n = 27) with CAC (χ2 = 21.2; P < .001).


Conclusions:

There was a significant relationship to diabetes for patients with CACs, indicating potential undiagnosed diabetes. Male patients with diabetes are significantly more at risk of developing CACs.


Practical implications:

People with CAC may be at risk of having undiagnosed diabetes and require heightened awareness during implant treatment planning.


Keywords:

Cone-beam computed tomography; carotid arterial disease; dental implant; diabetes mellitus.



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