EHS
EHS

The cognitive effects of anxiety and depression in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases


There is a sizeable literature describing the behavioral sequelae of multiple sclerosis (MS). This has traditionally been divided into 2 broad categories, namely, disorders of cognition and emotion. Few studies have explored the relationship between them and those that have were focused predominantly on depression rather than anxiety. In general, the results show that deficits in processing speed, working memory, and executive function can arise as a consequence of depression, albeit at the more severe end of the depressive spectrum. Given that cognitive dysfunction is a common and currently intractable symptom of MS, affecting up to 70% of people and impeding employment, relationships, and leisure pursuits,1 any condition that adds to this burden must be cause for concern.

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