EHS
EHS

Early Outcomes of Cardiac Surgery in Patients with Noonan Syndrome.


Related Articles

Early Outcomes of Cardiac Surgery in Patients with Noonan Syndrome.

Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2018 Dec 18;:

Authors: Hemmati P, Dearani JA, Daly RC, King KS, Ammash NM, Cetta F, Schaff HV

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: There is a paucity of cardiac surgery outcomes data for patients with Noonan syndrome (NS). Our objective was to evaluate early results in these patients.
METHODS: Between January 1999-December 2015, 29 patients (18 males, 62%) with NS underwent cardiac surgery at our institution. Mean age was 23±17.9 years; 12 (41%) were under 18 years of age. Fourteen patients (48%) had prior sternotomies.
RESULTS: The primary operations for the main diagnosis were pulmonary valve/conduit replacement/repair (n=14, 48%), septal myectomy for obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (n=7, 24%), aortic valve replacement/repair (n=4, 14%), atrial septal defect (ASD) repair (n=2, 7%), and cardiac transplantation (n=2, 7%). Concomitant procedures were performed in 24 patients (83%), most commonly right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction (n=13, 45%), mitral valve repair/replacement (n=7, 24%), and ASD repair (n=6, 21%). Mean bypass and cross-clamp times were 88.8±51 min and 54.7±67 min, respectively. There was one early death (3%). Postoperative morbidity occurred in 18 patients (62%), most commonly arrhythmias (n=14, 48%) or respiratory insufficiency/pneumonia (n=6, 21%). There were two early reoperations and four early readmissions. Univariate factors associated with morbidity included male gender (p=0.03) and longer cross-clamp time (p=0.02). Median length of hospital stay was six days (interquartile range 5-10.5 days).
CONCLUSIONS: Patients with NS frequently have multiple cardiac lesions requiring a broad spectrum of operations. Early mortality is low despite procedure complexity. Although early postoperative morbidity is common, patients overall do well with reasonable hospital lengths of stay. Additional studies are needed to evaluate long-term outcomes and quality of life.

PMID: 30576779 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Source link

EHS
Back to top button