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Teaching Video NeuroImages: Oculopalatal myoclonus: A possible consequence of brainstem injury


A 61-year-old man with previous left cerebellar infarct complained of double vision and dizziness several months postinfarct. Infarct is shown in the figure. Examination showed rotatory nystagmus in all directions of gaze, worse on left gaze (video 1). Oral examination showed palatal tremor (video 2). Oculopalatal tremor (OPT) is thought to result from interruption of connections between the red nucleus (midbrain), dentate nucleus (cerebellum), and inferior olive (medulla).1,2 The most common cause is brainstem infarction or hemorrhage,1 but it has also been observed with multiple sclerosis and other inflammatory entities. OPT usually becomes apparent several months after the injury. Treatment may include gabapentin, memantine, benzodiazepines, and valproic acid.

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