EHS
EHS

Resequencing core accessions of a pedigree identifies derivation of genomic segments and key agronomic trait loci during cotton improvement.

Related Articles

Resequencing core accessions of a pedigree identifies derivation of genomic segments and key agronomic trait loci during cotton improvement.

Plant Biotechnol J. 2018 Sep 16;:

Authors: Ma X, Wang Z, Li W, Zhang Y, Zhou X, Liu Y, Ren Z, Pei X, Zhou K, Zhang W, He K, Zhang F, Liu J, Ma W, Xiao G, Yang D

Abstract
Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) is the world’s largest source of natural fiber and dominates the global textile industry. Hybrid cotton varieties exhibit strong heterosis that confers high fiber yields, yet the genome-wide effects of artificial selection that have influenced Upland cotton during its breeding history are poorly understood. Here, we re-sequenced Upland cotton genomes and constructed a variation map of an intact breeding pedigree comprising seven elite and 19 backbone parents. Compared to wild accessions, the 26 pedigree accessions underwent strong artificial selection during domestication that has resulted in reduced genetic diversity but stronger linkage disequilibrium and higher extents of selective sweeps. In contrast to the backbone parents, the elite parents have acquired significantly improved agronomic traits, with an especially pronounced increase in the lint percentage. Notably, identify by descent (IBD) tracking revealed that the elite parents inherited abundant beneficial trait segments and loci from the backbone parents and our combined analyses led to the identification of a core genomic segment which was inherited in the elite lines from the parents Zhong 7263 and Ejing 1 and that was strongly associated with lint percentage. Additionally, SNP correlation analysis of this core segment showed that a nonsynonymous SNP (A-to-G) site in a gene encoding the cell-wall-associated receptor-like kinase 3 (GhWAKL3) protein was highly correlated with increased lint percentage. Our results substantially increase the valuable genomics resources available for future genetic and functional genomics studies of cotton and reveal insights that will facilitate yield increases in the molecular breeding of cotton. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PMID: 30220108 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Source link

EHS
Back to top button