EHS
EHS

Heart Disease Looks Different for Women

For years, women have been at a distinct disadvantage when it comes to heart disease.  Despite being the leading cause of death for both men and women, education and prevention efforts have long been targeted primarily toward men.  The result has been steadily declining rates of heart attack among middle-aged men and an increase among women of the same age.  The reasons behind the disparity are many.  Women tend to develop heart disease later on average than their male counterparts.  Treatment strategies have typically been less aggressive in women, and women are often underrepresented in clinical trials.  Finally, the presentation of heart disease often looks different in women, leading fewer patients and practitioners to recognize the danger and early warning signs.

EHS
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