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Photobiomodulation and different macrophages phenotypes during muscle tissue repair.

Photobiomodulation and different macrophages phenotypes during muscle tissue repair.

J Cell Mol Med. 2018 Jul 19;:

Authors: Souza NHC, Mesquita-Ferrari RA, Rodrigues MFSD, da Silva DFT, Ribeiro BG, Alves AN, Garcia MP, Nunes FD, da Silva Junior EM, França CM, Bussadori SK, Fernandes KPS

Abstract
Macrophages play a very important role in the conduction of several regenerative processes mainly due to their plasticity and multiple functions. In the muscle repair process, while M1 macrophages regulate the inflammatory and proliferative phases, M2 (anti-inflammatory) macrophages direct the differentiation and remodelling phases, leading to tissue regeneration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of red and near infrared (NIR) photobiomodulation (PBM) on macrophage phenotypes and correlate these findings with the repair process following acute muscle injury. Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: control; muscle injury; muscle injury + red PBM; and muscle injury + NIR PBM. After 2, 4 and 7 days, the tibialis anterior muscle was processed for analysis. Macrophages phenotypic profile was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and correlated with the different stages of the skeletal muscle repair by the qualitative and quantitative morphological analysis as well as by the evaluation of IL-6, TNF-α and TGF-β mRNA expression. Photobiomodulation at both wavelengths was able to decrease the number of CD68+ (M1) macrophages 2 days after muscle injury and increase the number of CD163+ (M2) macrophages 7 days after injury. However, only NIR treatment was able to increase the number of CD206+ M2 macrophages (Day 2) and TGF-β mRNA expression (Day 2, 4 and 7), favouring the repair process more expressivelly. Treatment with PBM was able to modulate the inflammation phase, optimize the transition from the inflammatory to the regeneration phase (mainly with NIR light) and improve the final step of regeneration, enhancing tissue repair.

PMID: 30024093 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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