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Iron Deficiency in Heart Failure: to Treat or Not to Treat?

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Iron Deficiency in Heart Failure: to Treat or Not to Treat?

Curr Treat Options Cardiovasc Med. 2018 Jul 18;20(8):65

Authors: Pope M, Kalra PR

Abstract
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review will highlight the frequency and prognostic importance of iron deficiency in patients with chronic heart failure. An overview of the evidence surrounding the use of both oral and intravenous iron will be presented together with discussion around what further data are required to establish what is the optimal long-term treatment strategy.
RECENT FINDINGS: Several recent randomised controlled studies have suggested that intravenous iron therapy in iron deficient patients with chronic heart failure and reduced ejection fraction can improve symptoms and quality of life, at least in the short term. There is no evidence of benefit from oral iron. Iron deficiency is common in patients with chronic heart failure and is associated with a worse prognosis. Whilst oral iron therapy has been shown to be of no benefit, randomised controlled trials suggest significant improvement in symptoms and quality of life with intravenous iron treatment over 6-12 months. Data are lacking on long-term efficacy, safety and impact on hard outcomes such as death and hospitalisation. Four large trials are currently recruiting patients and will provide definitive answers to these outstanding questions.

PMID: 30019227 [PubMed]

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