EHS
EHS

Does Reducing Clerkship Lengths by 25% Affect Medical Student Performance and Perceptions?

Does Reducing Clerkship Lengths by 25% Affect Medical Student Performance and Perceptions?

Acad Med. 2018 Jul 17;:

Authors: Monrad SU, Bibler Zaidi NL, Gruppen LD, Gelb DJ, Grum C, Morgan HK, Daniel M, Mangrulkar RS, Santen SA

Abstract
PURPOSE: Transforming a medical school curriculum wherein students enter clerkships earlier could result in two cohorts in clerkships simultaneously during the transition. To avoid overlapping cohorts at the University of Michigan Medical School, the length of all required clerkships was decreased by 25% during the 2016-2017 academic year, without instituting other systematic structural changes. The authors hypothesized that the reduction in clerkship duration would result in decreases in student performance and changes in student perceptions.
METHOD: One-way analyses of variance and Tukey’s post-hoc tests were used to compare the 2016-2017 shortened clerkship cohort to the preceding traditional clerkship cohorts (2014-2015 and 2015-2016) on the following student outcomes: National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) subject exam scores, year-end clinical skills exam scores, evaluation of clerkships, perceived stress, resiliency, well-being, and perception of the learning environment.
RESULTS: There were no significant differences in performance on NBME subject exams between the shortened clerkship cohort and the 2015-2016 traditional cohort, but scores declined significantly over the three years for one exam. Perceptions of clerkship quality improved for three shortened clerkships; there were no significant declines. Learning environment perceptions were not worse for the shortened clerkships. There were no significant differences in performance on the clinical skills exam or in perceived stress, resiliency, and well-being.
CONCLUSIONS: The optimal clerkship duration is a matter of strong opinion, supported by little empirical data. These results provide some evidence that accelerating clinical education may, for the studied outcomes, be feasible.

PMID: 30024474 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

EHS
Back to top button